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Wisconsin unemployment recovery ranked in bottom half nationally

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Wisconsin unemployment recovery ranked in bottom half nationally

July 06, 05:00 PM July 06, 05:00 PM

Wisconsin’s recovery from the massive unemployment endured during the COVID-19 pandemic is in the middle of the pack nationally, last week’s employment numbers indicate.

That assessment is according to a recently released WalletHub report, which ranked the state 28

th

nationwide for progress made between the previous week and the week of June 21, 2021, and 40

th

nationwide for the quickest unemployment recovery since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020.

On average, unemployment claims recovery in those states designated Red – based on how the majority of residents voted in the 2020 presidential election – fared better the so-called Blue states. On average, Red states ranked at 21.92 quickest and Blue states ranked 29.92 quickest.

The report compared the number of initial unemployment claims for the week ending June 24, 2019 and the week ending June 21, 2021, and noted a 81.57% change. WalletHub also noted a 38.63% drop in Wisconsin’s initial unemployment claims since the beginning of 2021 and a whopping 68.35% decline in the state’s initial unemployment claims between June 2020 and June 2021.

WalletHub released another study ranking Milwaukee and Madison at 131 and 21, respectively, among U.S. cities bouncing back from massive unemployment. According to data from May 2021, unemployment in Milwaukee was 7% and 3.1% in Madison.

The top five states with unemployment claims recovering most quickly are, in order: South Carolina, Kansas, Vermont, Arkansas and Michigan. Those states slowest to recover from unemployment caused by the pandemic are, in order: New Mexico, Rhode Island, District of Columbia, Virginia and Oklahoma.

The national unemployment rate rose to 14.8% at the height of the pandemic, but has since dropped 61% to its current level of 5.8%.

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